Space-A F.A.Q.

Click on a question to see the answer.

  1. Are Active Duty personnel in a leave or pass status traveling Space-A, always required to wear the service uniform?

  2. Are certain times of the year better for Space-A travel than others?

  3. Are specialized meals available to Space-A passengers?

  4. Are the dependents of deployed sponsors eligible to fly Space-A unaccompanied?

  5. Are there any circumstances under which a Retired service member in Category VI may be upgraded to a higher category?

  6. Are there pending base closures of which I need to be aware while planning Space-A travel?

  7. Are there special eligibility requirements for pregnant women and infants?

  8. As a Reservist, where can I fly?

  9. As a Retiree, where can I fly?

  10. As a Space-A passenger, may I pay for excess checked baggage over 140 pounds or two pieces?

  11. As a Space-A passenger, will I be subjected to security screening prior to boarding a flight?

  12. Can I have family members travel with another military member if given power of attorney, other releases, or authority?

  13. Can I shop at the Base/Post Exchange at my foreign destination?

  14. Can I shop at the Commissary at my foreign destination?

  15. Can I travel Space-A to Alaska or South America?

  16. Can the service member take leave and travel Space-A from the TDY point?

  17. Do you have an AMC Form 140 Space-A Travel Request available on this website?

  18. Do you have an alphabetical list of the two-letter country codes used on this website?

  19. Do you have an alphabetical list of the two-letter U.S. state, possession, and territory codes used on this website?

  20. Do you offer a tool to compare the different time zones around the world?

  21. Does rank/grade have anything to do with who gets a Space-A flight?

  22. How about Space-A availability?

  23. How are alcoholic beverages handled?

  24. How can I check on the safety of foreign countries while traveling?

  25. How can I find where my name is on the Space-A register?

  26. How can I get started planning my Space-A travel?

  27. How do I convert military time to standard time and vice versa?

  28. How is food service handled on USN, USMC, USCG, USAF (USAFR, USAG) and other non-AMC flights?

  29. How long does my name stay on the Space-A list?

  30. How much baggage can I carry with me into the passenger cabins?

  31. How much baggage can Space-A passengers check?

  32. How to make a Space-A Reservation

  33. I am a 100% disabled American veteran (DAV). Am I eligible to fly Space-A?

  34. I am fully qualified to fly space-a, but I require a wheelchair to get around. Can I still fly Space-A?

  35. I am retired and am traveling on a passport. My flight originated overseas. Where in the CONUS can I fly into?

  36. I am Retired military and disabled and carry a blue ID card. Can I have a brother, sister, or friend accompany me to help me?

  37. I see 3 and 4-digit codes used throughout this website to identify airports. Do you have a list indexing those codes to the corresponding airports?

  38. I suffer from a non-apparent handicap, such as hearing loss, asthma, a pacemaker etc. Can I still fly Space-A?

  39. I’m having trouble understanding the unfamiliar format of some of the overseas commercial phone numbers on this website. Can you explain how they work?

  40. Is food served to Space-A passengers on the flight?

  41. Is it easier to go to some destinations via Space-A?

  42. Is it feasible to travel around the entire world via Space-A?

  43. Is Space-A air travel a reasonable substitute for travel on a commercial airline?

  44. Is the baggage limit the same for all aircraft?

  45. Is there any difference in Space-A rules regarding eligibility for Active Duty versus Retired service members?

  46. Is there any way family members can travel Space-A to their sponsor’s TDY point?

  47. Map Legend

  48. May a Retired service member, who relies on a guide dog because of vision deficiency, travel with the animal aboard military aircraft Space-A?

  49. May adult family members who are dependent children because of a handicap or a permanent disability, and who have a valid DD Form 1173 military ID card, travel with their sponsor regardless of age?

  50. May all Active Duty and Retired members of all the Uniformed Services fly Space-A?

  51. May an Active Duty service member sign out on leave, sign up (register) for Space-A and if there is a wait for the flight, go back to work to avoid loss of leave time?

  52. May an Active Duty service member use Space-A to take dependents to his/her unaccompanied duty station overseas or back from overseas to CONUS after the unaccompanied duty tour is completed?

  53. May any eligible passenger make reservations for Space-A travel?

  54. May family members travel Space-A when the sponsor takes leave at the TDY point?

  55. May I register (sign-up) by fax, e-mail, letter/courier or in person at the same departure terminal more than one time for five different foreign countries in order to improve my chances for selection to a particular country?

  56. May National Guard and Reservists fly Space-A?

  57. May pets be transported Space-A?

  58. May the service member and dependents travel Space-A between CONUS and overseas?

  59. May uniformed services personnel on official temporary duty orders (TDY) elect to travel Space-A to the TDY point (station)?

  60. My husband was killed in Vietnam and is buried in the Punch Bowl (National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific) in Hawaii. The children and I would like to take a trip to Hawaii to visit his grave. Can we fly in a Space-A status?

  61. Should I expect to find more than one Space-A roster on a base?

  62. Some large people cannot buckle their seatbelts in many of the military aircraft with conventional airline seats, such as the C-005, C-017, and most of the smaller executive military aircraft. Can these passengers bring their own seatbelt extenders?

  63. We have heard that families and other groups can “pool” their baggage authorization. What’s the story?

  64. What are the trends in the availability of Space-A travel? Does it seem there will be more or less Space-A travel in the coming years?

  65. What can service families do if they become extremely ill while overseas and need to return to the United States?

  66. What do I need to know about foreign clearances when traveling?

  67. What documents are required for traveling Space-A?

  68. What does it mean to be “bumped?”

  69. What facilities are available at military terminals (nursery, BX, snack bar)?

  70. What fees will Space-A passengers be required to pay?

  71. What happened to Medevac flights?

  72. What happens to my sign-up records at a departure location when I fly from that station?

  73. What if I still have questions about Space-A travel?

  74. What information do you provide for each Space-A arrival/destination installation?

  75. What is “show time?”

  76. What is a simple summary of the complex guidelines governing Space-A travel during TDY status?

  77. What is country sign-up and how does it affect me?

  78. What is remote sign-up?

  79. What is self sign-up?

  80. What is the best time of the year to travel Space-A?

  81. What is the DSN Phone System and how is it used?

  82. What is the Environmental and Morale Leave (EML) Program?

  83. What is the Julian Date Calendar and how does it work?

  84. What is the scope of the DoD student travel program?

  85. What Paperwork is Needed to Fly Space-A with My Service Animal?

  86. When may National Guard and Reservist eligible family members fly Space-A?

  87. When the service member’s duty station and TDY location are in different countries overseas, and the service member travels Space-A to CONUS, may they return Space- A to their duty station?

  88. Where can I view a complete listing of DOD Space-A regulations?

  89. Which uniformed service uses Space-A more than the others?

  90. Who can fly space-a?

  91. Who determines eligibility to fly Space-A?

  92. Who flies Space-A the most – enlisted personnel, officers, retired members or dependents?

  93. Who has priority on Space-A flights?

  94. Who may fly on National Guard and Reserve flights of the Military Services?

  95. Why are some phone numbers on this website preceded by C-, while others are preceded by DSN-?

  96. Why Are the Outgoing and/or Incoming Space-A Flights Sections of a Space-A Terminal Blank?

  97. Will I be able to shop at the post/base Commissary and Exchange at my foreign destination?

  98. Will Space-A travel cost much?

1. Are Active Duty personnel in a leave or pass status traveling Space-A, always required to wear the service uniform?

No. All Active Duty members (except USMC personnel flying on USMC aircraft) in a leave or pass status traveling Space-A on military department owned and operated aircraft are not required to wear the class A or B uniform of their service.

2. Are certain times of the year better for Space-A travel than others?

Space-available travel occurs year round. However, travelers will find it is much more difficult to travel during the summer months (June-August) and the November-December holiday periods. It is particularly important that passengers be prepared to make alternate arrangements if they are only able to travel during these times.

3. Are specialized meals available to Space-A passengers?

Specialized meals are made available for duty passengers only for medical or religious reasons. If you need special food, we suggest you bring your own to maintain flexibility. Check with the Air Passenger Terminals regarding any restrictions on carrying food aboard as this can differ from place to place. While you can make your requirements known to passenger processing personnel at the time of flight processing, the chance of having additional specialized meals available at the last minute for passengers might be slim.

4. Are the dependents of deployed sponsors eligible to fly Space-A unaccompanied?

Yes. The DoD has recently updated the policy for dependent Space-A travel of deployed sponsors.  If the sponsor is deployed for any period of 30 days or more, dependents are authorized Space-A travel to/from CONUS and OCONUS locations, and within/between OCONUS theaters ONLY during the sponsor’s deployment. This authorization begins on the sponsor’s departure date and ends on the sponsor’s return date. Submission of a Dependent Verification Letter is required. For more details, please see Page 37, para. 4.9.b of the document linked below:
               DoD Instruction 4515.13
               Sample Dependent Verification Letter

5. Are there any circumstances under which a Retired service member in Category VI may be upgraded to a higher category?

​You bet there are. If you are traveling Space-A overseas and an emergency occurs at home, you may be upgraded to Category I, Emergency Leave, Unfunded Travel, by the installation commander or his representative under para 7-C, Chapter 6, DoDI 4515.13. However, you should have the emergency verified, in writing, by the American Red Cross before attempting to obtain an upgrade.

6. Are there pending base closures of which I need to be aware while planning Space-A travel?

During the next five years there are several European bases that are planned to either close or realign with other bases. For this publication’s purposes, we are only including those bases closing that currently offer Space-A flights. No closure/realignment dates, firm or projected, have been set at press time of this publication. Be sure to call ahead before including these locations in your Space-A travel plans.

Stuttgart Army Airfield. This base will realign at Kaiserslautern Community U.S. Army Garrison, Ramstein Base*

Lajes Field Air Base Azores. This facility will reduce military and civilian personnel along with facilities.*

RAF Mildenhall. This base, support sites and facilities will be handed over to the United Kingdom. Operational units will be relocated to other active sites within Europe.*

RAF Alconbury/RAF Molesworth. This base along with its support facilities will also be turned over to the United Kingdom. United States personnel are scheduled to be reassigned to RAF Croughton.*

*All information obtained via Army Times Publishing Company® Issue date 01/19/2015.

7. Are there special eligibility requirements for pregnant women and infants?

Yes. Children must be older than six weeks to fly on military aircraft. If the infant is younger than six weeks old, there must be written permission from a physician to fly for mother and child. Pregnant women may fly without approval until their 34th week of pregnancy. In a medical emergency, a pregnant woman of more than 34 weeks or a child younger than six weeks and the mother will be flown on a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) flight as patients.

8. As a Reservist, where can I fly?

Reserve members with DD Form 2 identification and DD Form 1853 may fly to, from, and between Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and CONUS. They may NOT fly to foreign countries until the military member is age 60 AND drawing retired pay. Additionally, when on active duty (for 30 days or more), members may fly anywhere overseas that the Armed Services has flights operating.

9. As a Retiree, where can I fly?

Retired members with DD Form 2 (Blue; the old form is gray) identification card may fly anywhere that the Armed Services has flights operating including CONUS, with the exception of occasional restricted areas such as Vietnam and Diego Garcia which have been restricted for many years. As of the publication of this FAQ, all categories of Space-A travel, with few exceptions, into, within and out of the CENTCOM AOR are suspended. Some areas require special permission to enter, such as Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and Wake Island.

10. As a Space-A passenger, may I pay for excess checked baggage over 140 pounds or two pieces?

No. Only duty status passengers may pay for excess baggage. NOTE: Please see Space-A Travel Tips for more information on baggage.

11. As a Space-A passenger, will I be subjected to security screening prior to boarding a flight?

Yes. In most cases you and your baggage will receive electronic and/or personal security screening prior to boarding the flight or entering a secure area for aircraft boarding.

12. Can I have family members travel with another military member if given power of attorney, other releases, or authority?

No, with the exception of Category IV EML Leave and Category V, command-sponsored dependents may only travel when accompanied by their sponsor.

13. Can I shop at the Base/Post Exchange at my foreign destination?

That depends! For the latest, detailed information on eligibility to shop at the Base/Post Exchanges at overseas locations, please see this webpage: http://www.aafes.com/exchange-stores/overseas.

14. Can I shop at the Commissary at my foreign destination?

That depends on your status (active duty, dependent, retired etc.) and the location.
 

Commissary privileges overseas are covered under Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA), Visiting Forces agreements, treaties, etc. Since products sold in overseas commissaries pass across international borders and are customs, duty, and tax free; there are shopping restrictions. These restrictions are to protect the interest of the host nation and to resolve legal, customs, and tax issues. The agreements allow for some exemptions from host nation tax laws, but nonetheless, the privilege is substantially restricted and will vary from country to country. These agreements are negotiated between the Military Services, the U.S. State Department, and the host nation. Some countries allow exemptions from host nation tax laws; others require the payment of taxes, fees, or tariffs. Many do not allow the purchase of rationed items for visitors.
 

Other countries have minimum stay requirements to be eligible, but the privilege is restricted for military personnel, retired, DoD civilians, DoD contractors and their family members. In addition, commissary privileges for DoD contractors, stationed and TDY overseas are restrictive, and are not automatic – contracting officers/contracting officers representative (COR) must obtain and follow the theater commander's determination of overseas commissary privileges for contractors.
 

The Military Services, installation commanders, and the Defense Commissary Agency must enforce and cannot grant exceptions to the agreements. DoD civilians and DoD contractors in TDY status unless on emergency evacuation orders to the U.S. from overseas area not authorized commissary privileges. DoD civilians not on official duty from the U.S. to overseas are not entitled to overseas commissary privileges.
 

Please refer to the following website for detailed, up-to-date information on Commissary shopping at foreign locations: https://www.commissaries.com/customer-service/faqs

15. Can I travel Space-A to Alaska or South America?

Yes. Travelers may obtain Space-A travel to Alaska, South America, and other interesting locations; i.e., Australia, New Zealand, etc. Travel to Alaska is relatively easy when departing from the West Coast (Travis AFB, CA, and McChord AFB, WA). Travel to South America and other remote areas is more difficult. Infrequent flights to remote areas are primarily cargo missions and have few seats available for passenger movement. Expect long waiting periods for movement.

16. Can the service member take leave and travel Space-A from the TDY point?

Upon arrival at the TDY point, personnel must conduct their business in a TDY status. They may then take ordinary leave while at the TDY point and travel Space-A from the TDY point to another location, but leave must be terminated prior to return travel from the TDY point of origin to the service member’s duty station or next TDY location.

17. Do you have an AMC Form 140 Space-A Travel Request available on this website?

Yes. Please click on the link below to open the AMC 140. You can fill in the form by using your cursor or tab key to “jump” from field to field, and typing in your information. Then, you can download it and/or print it to be faxed, emailed or turned in at the terminal!

AMC Form 140 Space-A Travel Request

18. Do you have an alphabetical list of the two-letter country codes used on this website?

AC-Ascension Island
AE-United Arab Emirates
AF-Afghanistan
AG-Antigua & Barbuda
AN-Netherlands Antilles
AR-Argentina
AU-Australia
BA-Bosnia & Herzegovina
BB-Barbados
BE-Belgium
BH-Bahrain
BO-Bolivia
BR-Brazil
BS-Bahamas
BZ-Belize
CA-Canada
CL-Chile
CO-Colombia
CR-Costa Rica
CS-Kosovo (Serbia & Montenegro)
CY-Cyprus
DE-Germany
DK-Denmark
DO-Dominican Republic
EC-Ecuador
EG-Egypt, Arab Republic of
ES-Spain
FM-Federated States of Micronesia
GA-Gabon
GB-United Kingdom
GR-Greece
GT-Guatemala
GY-Guyana
HN-Honduras
HT-Haiti
ID-Indonesia
IE-Ireland
IL-Israel
IO-British Indian Ocean Territory
IT-Italy
JM-Jamaica
JO-Jordan
JP-Japan
KE-Kenya
KG-Kyrgyzstan
KR-Republic of Korea
KW-Kuwait
KY-Cayman Islands
KV- Kosovo
MK-Macedonia, (Former Yugoslav
Republic of)
NI-Nicaragua
NO-Norway
NZ-New Zealand
OM-Oman
PA-Panama, Republic of
PE-Peru
PH-Philippines, Republic of the
PT-Portugal
PW-Republic of Palau
PY-Paraguay
QA-Qatar
SG-Singapore
SN-Senegal
SR-Suriname
SV-El Salvador
TD-Chad
TH-Thailand
TR-Turkey
TT-Trinidad and Tobago
US-United States
UY-Uruguay
UZ-Uzbekistan

19. Do you have an alphabetical list of the two-letter U.S. state, possession, and territory codes used on this website?

Yes. Please see the following lists (U.S. possessions and territories are at the bottom):

STATE ABBREVIATIONS

AK-Alaska

AL-Alabama

AR-Arkansas

AZ-Arizona

CA-California

CO-Colorado

CT-Connecticut

DC-District of Columbia

DE-Delaware

FL-Florida

GA-Georgia

HI-Hawaii

IA-Iowa

ID-Idaho

IL-Illinois

IN-Indiana

KS-Kansas

KY-Kentucky

LA-Louisiana

MA-Massachusetts

MD-Maryland

ME -Maine

MI-Michigan

MN-Minnesota

MO-Missouri

MS-Mississippi

MT-Montana

NE-Nebraska

NC-North Carolina

ND-North Dakota

NH-New Hampshire

NJ-New Jersey

NM-New Mexico

NY-New York

NV-Nevada

OH-Ohio

OK-Oklahoma

OR-Oregon

PA-Pennsylvania

RI-Rhode Island

SC-South Carolina

SD-South Dakota

TN-Tennessee

TX-Texas

UT-Utah

VA-Virginia

VT-Vermont

WA-Washington

WI-Wisconsin

WV-West Virginia

WY-Wyoming

US POSSESSION/TERRITORY ABBREVIATIONS

AS-American Samoa

GU-Guam

MH-Marshall Islands (includes Kwajalein Atoll)

PR-Puerto Rico

UM-Wake Island

20. Do you offer a tool to compare the different time zones around the world?

Yes. Please see the Standard Time Conversion Table linked below:

Standard Time Conversion Table

21. Does rank/grade have anything to do with who gets a Space-A flight?

No. Travel opportunities are available on a first-in first-out basis within DoD established categories. Travel is afforded on an equitable basis to officers, enlisted personnel, DoD, other civilian employees and their dependents without regard to rank or grade, military or civilian or branch of service.

22. How about Space-A availability?

Space-A air opportunities change daily and, in fact, even hourly. There are more than 200 active locations at which uniformed personnel, their eligible family members, and others may fly Space-A. There are also many other less active locations which offer some Space-A air opportunities. We estimate that more than 800,000 Space-A flights (all services) are taken every year. Availability is subject to time of the year, air mission, needs of the military services, quantity of flights, frequency of flights and the number of people attempting to fly Space-A. This large number of interactive variables which impact Space-A Air Opportunities makes it very difficult to precisely predict the availability of Space-A seats to a particular destination at a precise time.

23. How are alcoholic beverages handled?

Alcoholic beverages are not served on military aircraft. All open (seals broken) containers of alcoholic beverages will be confiscated if on your person or in your carry-on baggage. In many cases, sealed alcoholic containers may be checked. Check with the Air Passenger Terminal for more information. You may not consume alcoholic beverages from your own supply on a military aircraft. The AMC commercial contract flights, which frequently carry Space-A passengers, offer alcoholic beverages to everyone of legal age. Beer and wine are $4.00 and mixed drinks are $5.00 (prices can vary per airline).

24. How can I check on the safety of foreign countries while traveling?

Unfortunately, travel to a foreign country can potentially expose the military traveler to dangers relating to civil unrest, terrorism, criminal activity, etc. The U.S. State Department maintains an “Alerts and Warnings” website to advise the traveler of current conditions that may warrant traveler caution or even cancellation of planned travel to a foreign location.

A Travel Alert is issued for short-term events that the State Department believes the traveler should be aware of before traveling to a foreign location. This may include strikes, demonstrations or disturbances, health alerts for outbreaks of disease or an elevated risk of terrorist attacks. These are usually short term and are canceled when the events triggering the alert have passed.

A Travel Warning is a more serious caution and should encourage the traveler to consider avoiding any travel to the foreign location. Examples of events triggering a Travel Warning are unstable governments, civil war, ongoing intense criminal activity or violence, or frequent terrorist attacks. These warnings remain in place until the situation changes; some have been in effect for years.

U.S. State Department Travel Alerts and Warnings may be found at the following website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings.html.

We strongly urge all travelers to review these Travel Alerts and Warnings prior to planning travel to any foreign destination. If traveling Space-A, your Space-A Passenger Service representative may also be able to advise of any safety concerns regarding travel to your planned foreign destination.

The U.S. State Department also offers a program called the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). This is a free service that allows travelers abroad to inform the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate about details of their trip. This will allow the traveler to get information from the embassy about safety conditions in the destination country. It also enables the embassy to contact you in case of an emergency, natural disaster, civil unrest or family emergency at home. Travelers may sign up for STEP at the following website: https://step.state.gov/step.

25. How can I find where my name is on the Space-A register?

Each terminal maintains a Space-A register (organized by priority (category of traveler) and the date and time of registration for travel) that is updated daily. The register is conveniently located in the terminal and directly accessible to you. Travelers may call the terminal directly to find where they stand travel wise.

26. How can I get started planning my Space-A travel?

First, answer the following questions:

Do you have a specific destination to which you wish to travel?

This is called Backward Planning. (This will limit the number of places which you can use as your originating station.) In this case, you will work backward by planning your trip from your desired final destination.

Step 1: Choose your destination, and click on our handy links to that country, possession or state to familiarize yourself with the possible places where you may fly as your final destination. Then go to step 2.

Step 2: Locate the destination station that you have chosen. There, you will find a list of originating stations from which (military installation/airport) you may travel Space-A to reach your desired destination.

Step 3: At this point you have two options. You can decide if you wish to travel to one of the originating stations using commercial air, bus, train, car, etc., or if you want to use Space-A to get to that originating destination. (Note: The listing for each Space-A servicing location includes the nearest major civilian airport or the civilian airport most usually used to travel to/from the Space-A servicing location to help in your travel arrangements.)

Step 4: If you need to plan another leg to your trip, simply start again with Step 1, using your originating station selected above as your destination. Repeat the above steps as necessary. You will have to use the flight information provided in the listings (and call the departure locations to confirm that the flight is operating and the days of departure along with the show times, if available) in order to plan efficiently, and limit your time between flights.

Note: On multi-legged trip planning: For overseas destinations, you may wish to plan several legs to your trip, especially if there is not an originating station to your desired destination near your home/starting point. If you can fly from an originating station near your home to a CONUS/OCONUS destination, and from that place, fly on to your final desired destination, you will have a lot more options!

Do you want to travel from a specific originating station (military installation or airport), but are less concerned with where you are going?

This is called Forward Planning. (This will decrease the number of places you can select as final destinations, but will also decrease travel expenses associated with getting to your originating station.)

Step 1: In this case, plan your trip by selecting the link for your desired originating station to examine all of the possibilities for final destinations.

Step 2: If you want to add another leg to your trip, after you have done Step 1, then look in the table of contents for the flights originating from your final destination selected in Step 1. Repeat this step as necessary.

Final notes:

Don’t forget to plan your return trip home! In order to be higher up on the Space-A roster, be sure to sign up for your return at your destination station before you leave home (provided that you are not remaining at your destination station more than 60 days, which is the time limit that you can remain on the Space-A roster without a new sign-up).

If you plan a multi-legged trip, be sure to sign up on the Space-A roster at all originating flight locations!

 

* * * IMPORTANT WARNING * * *

If you have planned a trip with more than one leg, then you will have to sign up again on the Space-A roster after you fly out of a location, as you will have fulfilled your Space-A from that location, and will be removed from the roster! For example, if you have applied for Space-A travel from Rota NS, ES to CONUS, but while waiting for this transportation you take a flight from Rota NS, ES to Aviano AB, IT, then your application for Space-A from Rota NS, ES to CONUS will be deleted from the computer system when you fly out of Rota NS, ES to Aviano AB, IT. To keep your application to CONUS in place at Rota NS, ES, fly from Moron AB, ES to Aviano AB, IT. Many first-time Space-A travelers miss this important point and end up at the bottom of the list on the day they wish to return/fly to CONUS. It is no fun to be stuck at a military installation/airport when you thought you would be flying home!

27. How do I convert military time to standard time and vice versa?

Please see the right side of the chart linked below to convert military time to standard time and vice versa:

Military Time Conversion Chart

28. How is food service handled on USN, USMC, USCG, USAF (USAFR, USAG) and other non-AMC flights?

Most departure terminals have food service for crews and passengers. If the flight duration is more than approximately four hours, you will be notified in time to obtain your own box of food and drinks. Most flights have coffee and tea and all flights have drinking water on board.

29. How long does my name stay on the Space-A list?

All travelers remain on the register for 60 days after registration, for the duration of their travel orders authorization, or until they are selected for travel, whichever occurs first. Revalidation has been eliminated.

30. How much baggage can I carry with me into the passenger cabins?

All passengers boarding the aircraft can carry on one or more pieces so long as they fit under the passenger’s seat, in the overhead compartment or other approved storage area, e.g., closets for hang-up garment bags. If available storage space is important to your baggage-carrying needs, inquire at the terminal regarding storage areas for carry-on baggage before checking your baggage for a particular flight. As a guideline carry-on bags should not exceed 45 linear inches (length + width + height = 45 inches). Passengers traveling with infants can also carry on child safety seats regardless of any other baggage. Child safety seats are not required on AMC and commercial carriers, but are strongly encouraged.

31. How much baggage can Space-A passengers check?

Each Space-A passenger (regardless of age) can check two pieces of baggage totaling 140 pounds. Air Mobility Command (AMC) limits the size of each item to 62 linear inches. This measurement is obtained by adding together the item’s length, width and height. The rules permit some exceptions to the 62 linear inches size limitation. For Active Duty personnel, all duffel bags, sea bags, Air Force issue B-4 bags and civilian-origin versions that have the same approximate dimensions can be checked. Similarly, the size restrictions do not apply to golf bags with golf clubs, snow skis, folding bicycles, fishing equipment, musical instruments and rucksacks. Any one of these over-sized items listed above may be checked if it is the only piece checked and meets weight requirements of 140 pounds total.

32. How to make a Space-A Reservation

In order to fly Space-A, eligible passengers must register (sign up) at the military passenger terminal from which they want to depart. Uniformed service members must be on leave or pass status when they sign up. Registration can be very competitive at some busy terminals, so be sure to sign up as early as you can.

  • Passenger registration. You can sign up on the terminal’s register up to 60 days in advance. You may sign up for more than one destination and at more than one terminal. When you sign up, make sure you have your military ID and leave papers (if necessary). Some terminals accept fax or email sign up, but procedures vary by terminal. For contact information on military passenger terminals, visit AMC Space Available Travel Page. (Editor’s Note: For detailed registration information  specific to each Space-A terminal on our website, see our website Space-A Home Page). When you get to your destination, be sure to register for a return flight.

  • Categories. Once registered, you are assigned a passenger category. These categories determine how seats are assigned. Within each category, passengers are prioritized based on the date and time they registered. Available seats are assigned first to Category I passengers, continuing through the categories until all empty seats are filled.

    • Category I. Active duty service members and their accompanying families traveling on emergency leave.

    • Category II. Service members and their accompanying family members traveling on EML. This includes command-sponsored family members who are stationed outside the continental United States.

    • Category III. Service members and their accompanying families traveling on ordinary leave or reenlistment leave status, and unaccompanied family members of service members deployed 365 consecutive days or more. This category also includes service members and their families on house-hunting leave.

    • Category IV. Unaccompanied family members on EML orders and eligible family members of service members deployed 120 days or more.

    • Category V. Students whose sponsor is stationed in Alaska or Hawaii and students enrolled in a trade school within the continental United States when the sponsor is stationed overseas.

    • Category VI. Retirees and their accompanying family members. This category also includes Guard and reserve members who are traveling within CONUS, Alaska, Hawaii and U.S. territories.

For more detailed descriptions, go to AMC Space Available Travel Page

  • Documentation. Make sure you understand what documentation you will need to travel, including:

    • Your military ID

    • A copy of your leave orders, if applicable (for emergency leave, EML or ordinary leave passengers)

    • Unaccompanied family members of service members who are deployed for 120 days or more need a letter verifying eligibility from the service member’s commanding officer

    • A passport and appropriate visas (if traveling overseas)

    • DD Form 1853: Verification of Reserve Status for Travel Eligibility (for eligible Guard and reserve members)

  • At the terminal. Plan to arrive at the terminal early. Space-A seats can be released two or three hours before a scheduled flight. Check with the passenger counter to be sure you are registered for the flight and your documents are in order.

Source: http://www.militaryonesource.mil

33. I am a 100% disabled American veteran (DAV). Am I eligible to fly Space-A?

Effective 13 August 2018, DOD Veterans with Service-Connected Disabilities rated as Total, are granted Space-Available travel eligibility. National Defense Authorization Act was signed into law on 13 August 2018. The following changes are implemented:

-Veterans must have DD Form 2765 (Military ID).

-Veterans under this new eligibility will be placed in Category VI and will be authorized to remain in the Space-available backlog up to 60 days.

-These veterans are authorized to travel only within the CONUS and to U.S. Territories.

-Eligibility is now extended to accompanying dependent family members of these veterans as of 23 October 2020.

34. I am fully qualified to fly space-a, but I require a wheelchair to get around. Can I still fly Space-A?

Regretfully, no. the following is extracted from an AMC GRAM PASSENGER TRAVEL INFORMATION dated 21 Jun 2016:

PASSENGERS WITH NON-APPARENT HANDICAPS: Passengers with non-apparent handicaps including hearing, asthma, or pacemakers should advise a passenger service agent during check-in. Passengers with a handicap preventing movement under their own power are not permitted on AMC aircraft.

See the original document here. Please see page 2, paragraph 5 titled, “PASSENGERS WITH NON-APPARENT HANDICAPS”

35. I am retired and am traveling on a passport. My flight originated overseas. Where in the CONUS can I fly into?

When traveling on a passport, all family members, retired uniform service, reserve, and others may return to the CONUS only through authorized ports of entry where customs and immigration clearance is available. While you may depart the CONUS from any military airfield, reentry locations for passport holders are limited. Active duty passengers who do not require immigration clearance have more reentry options available.

36. I am Retired military and disabled and carry a blue ID card. Can I have a brother, sister, or friend accompany me to help me?

The only persons permitted to accompany you are your dependents or other persons eligible for Space-A travel. Every effort shall be made to transport passengers with disabilities who are otherwise eligible to travel. Passenger service personnel and crew members shall provide assistance in boarding, seating, and deplaning passengers with special needs.

37. I see 3 and 4-digit codes used throughout this website to identify airports. Do you have a list indexing those codes to the corresponding airports?

Yes! Please click one of the links below to access our 3-digit (IATA) code airport index or our 4-digit (ICAO) code airport index. Each provides an alphabetical listing of the codes and what airport they represent.

Three Digit Airport Code Index (IATA Codes)

Four Digit Airport Code Index (ICAO)

38. I suffer from a non-apparent handicap, such as hearing loss, asthma, a pacemaker etc. Can I still fly Space-A?

Yes, but Passengers with non-apparent handicaps including hearing, asthma, or pacemakers should advise a passenger service agent during check-in.

See AMC document here.

39. I’m having trouble understanding the unfamiliar format of some of the overseas commercial phone numbers on this website. Can you explain how they work?

Telephone numbers preceded by a C- are commercial telephone numbers. (If you have questions about the military DSN phone system, please return to the FAQs for more information on the Defense Switched Network phone system.)

The commercial phone number listings on this website contain detailed telephone numbers and prefixes for dialing from a civilian telephone to a military telephone (where this capability exists). All commercial telephone number formats listed assume that the call is being placed from a commercial telephone in North America from a civilian, commercial system (as opposed to DSN). For example, the telephone information section for Ramstein Air Base in Germany looks like this: Main installation numbers: C-011-49-6371-47-1113, DSN-314-480-1110. All telephone information sections for Germany and for most installations in other countries with civilian to military dialing capabilities follow this same basic pattern.

The main civilian number breaks down as follows: the first set of numbers (011) is the international dialing access number for North America; the second set of numbers (49) is the country code for Germany; the third set of numbers (6371) is local area/city code within Germany; the fourth set of numbers (47) is the civilian to military conversion number; and the last set of numbers (1113) is the line or extension number.

IMPORTANT: All local area codes in Germany and several other countries in Europe begin with a “0”which is not used when dialing into the country (except Italy) but must be added if dialing within the country. In Germany, if you are within the boundaries of the local area code, you will not need to dial the local area code (6371) when dialing a civilian number or a defense number. Dial the military conversion number (47) and the military extension when dialing from a local commercial telephone.

Note: When placing overseas calls, one should dial slowly, particularly pausing where we have placed a hyphen in the telephone number, i.e. 011- (pause) 49- (pause) 6371- (pause) 47- (pause) 1110. Also, when dialing a fax number, press your pause button (refer to your manual for instructions) anywhere we have placed a hyphen in the fax number.

40. Is food served to Space-A passengers on the flight?

Food and soft drinks are free on AMC contract flights. Space-A passengers, like duty passengers, may purchase beer and wine on AMC contract flights. There is a charge if Space-A passengers want to eat on other (military) flights. You can purchase healthy heart menus from the in-flight kitchen. The small meal includes sandwich, salad or vegetables, fruit and milk or soft drink. The breakfast menu includes cereal or bagel, fruit, danish and milk or juice. The large meal includes sandwich, fruit, vegetable or salad, snack or dessert, milk, juice or soft drink. These meals are served at the appropriate time in the flight. Reservations for meals are made at the time of seat assignment or other times in the flight processing. You may bring your own snacks (food) aboard (no alcoholic beverages). New meal prices are established on 1 October each year.

41. Is it easier to go to some destinations via Space-A?

Yes. Some destinations, such as Travis, Ramstein and Andrews, have a large number of incoming flights daily and may even host regularly scheduled flights or shuttles. This, of course, provides more opportunities for the Space-A traveler to travel to those destinations. Other locations may only have occasional incoming flights which limits opportunities for the Space-A traveler. Please check the “Flight Destinations/Frequency” data provided for each installation in our Space-A Guide for more information.

42. Is it feasible to travel around the entire world via Space-A?

No. There are insufficient Space-A flights to circumnavigate the earth north to south or south to north. There are adequate flights to travel around the earth east to west or west to east. However, there is one choke point, Diego Garcia Atoll (NKW/KJDG), Chagos Archipelago, IO, through which you are not authorized to travel Space-A. The Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) has limited access to Diego Garcia to mission-essential personnel. Space-A travel through Diego Garcia, including circuitous travel for personnel on official orders, is not authorized. This prohibition is found in SECDEF message 250439Z JAN 1986 and the DoD Foreign Clearance Guides. Commercial facilities at this British territory in the Indian Ocean are extremely limited to nonexistent. The Diego Garcia Naval Base does not have lodging, messing and other support facilities for non-mission essential travelers.

43. Is Space-A air travel a reasonable substitute for travel on a commercial airline?

The answer depends on you! If your travel schedule is flexible and your finances permit for a stay (sometimes in a “high-cost” area), while awaiting movement, Space-A travel is a good travel choice. While some travelers sign up and travel the same day, many factors could come together to make buying a commercial ticket your best or only option. Remember, Space-A travel success depends on flexibility, patience and good timing.

44. Is the baggage limit the same for all aircraft?

No. The baggage limit for smaller executive aircraft is considerably less. On small two-engine executive and operational support aircraft, the baggage limit for Space-A passengers is 30 pounds.

45. Is there any difference in Space-A rules regarding eligibility for Active Duty versus Retired service members?

Yes. First, Active Duty sponsors personnel have priority (Categories I Emergency Leave [retirees may be added to this category when approved under special circumstances], II EML, III Ordinary Leave, IV Unaccompanied Dependents on EML and V Permissive TDY) on Space-A flights at all times. Other differences include the fact that Active Duty personnel may take their “dependent” mothers and fathers (who have ID Cards DD Form 1173), with them on Space-A trips. Dependent in-laws are NOT included in this privilege. Retired members do not have this privilege, and Retired members and their families travel in Category VI.

46. Is there any way family members can travel Space-A to their sponsor’s TDY point?

No. Family members are not authorized Space-A to and from a sponsor’s TDY point. TDY personnel may not travel Space-A between their duty station and TDY point as a means to have their dependents travel with them.

47. Map Legend

Click here to view the Map Legend.

48. May a Retired service member, who relies on a guide dog because of vision deficiency, travel with the animal aboard military aircraft Space-A?

Yes. This is allowed when the dog is properly harnessed and muzzled and the animal does not obstruct the aisle. Also, the dog may not occupy a seat in the aircraft, it must sit at the feet of the service member.​

49. May adult family members who are dependent children because of a handicap or a permanent disability, and who have a valid DD Form 1173 military ID card, travel with their sponsor regardless of age?

Yes. They may travel on the same basis as any other dependent. Documentation of the dependent’s permanent disability may be required.

50. May all Active Duty and Retired members of all the Uniformed Services fly Space-A?

Yes. All Active Duty and Retired members (as well as their eligible family members) of all seven uniformed services (U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Public Health Service Officer Corps, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Officer Corps and U.S. Air Force) may fly Space-A as provided for in DoD 4515.13 as revised.

51. May an Active Duty service member sign out on leave, sign up (register) for Space-A and if there is a wait for the flight, go back to work to avoid loss of leave time?

When registering for Space-A travel, the member must have an approved leave or pass authorization effective on or before the date of registration for Space-A travel. You must show your approved leave with an effective date on or before your sign-up date. If a member registers for Space-A travel but voluntarily returns to work during the intervening days before the actual flight departure, leave will be charged for those days. You must be on leave throughout your entire Space-A leave travel period.

52. May an Active Duty service member use Space-A to take dependents to his/her unaccompanied duty station overseas or back from overseas to CONUS after the unaccompanied duty tour is completed?

No. Family members may use Space-A only when they are with the sponsor on an accompanied tour (on service orders) overseas. The Space-A privilege is intended only for a visit to an overseas or CONUS area on a round-trip basis with the sponsor. Also unaccompanied dependents with a command authorization letter may travel in category V to Korea. Space-A cannot be used to establish a home for dependents overseas or in CONUS.

53. May any eligible passenger make reservations for Space-A travel?

No. Space-A passengers may not make reservations and are not guaranteed seats. The application for Space-A travel is not a reservation. The DoD is not obligated to continue Space-A passengers’ travel or to return them to their point of origin.

54. May family members travel Space-A when the sponsor takes leave at the TDY point?

Family members may join the sponsor at the TDY point (at their own expense) in order to travel Space-A with the sponsor while the sponsor is on leave.

55. May I register (sign-up) by fax, e-mail, letter/courier or in person at the same departure terminal more than one time for five different foreign countries in order to improve my chances for selection to a particular country?

Space-A passengers may have only one registration (sign-up) record at a passenger terminal specifying a maximum of five countries (the fifth country may be “ALL” in order to allow the widest opportunity for Space-A air travel). This record may be changed at any time to include adding or deleting countries to which a passenger desire to travel, but the Julian date and time will be adjusted to the date of the latest change. No passenger may have two or more records with separate information; however, you may sign up at several departure terminals in order to improve your chances for selection for air travel. This may change in the near future if “round-trip sign-up or one-time sign up” is approved. For example, in the Mid-Atlantic States Area you can sign up at McGuire AFB, Baltimore/Washington IAP, Andrews AFB and Dover AFB for air travel to Central Europe and the Near East Area.

56. May National Guard and Reservists fly Space-A?

National Guard members and Reservists in an Active paid status may fly anywhere in CONUS, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Guard and Reserve members cannot fly Space-A to a foreign country. Guard and Reserve members must have the ID Card, DD Form 2, and DD Form 1853, Authentication of Reserve Status for Travel Eligibility (authenticated by the Unit Commander within the last six months). The same is true of Guard and Reserve personnel who have received official notification of retirement eligibility but have not reached retirement age (60). This “gray area” retirement eligible group must present their ID cards (Red) and retirement eligibility notices (letters) or possess a red DD Form 2 which has been generated from the DEERS database.

57. May pets be transported Space-A?

Not by Space-A passengers. However, Active Duty personnel may move pets Space-A on military contract flights when the sponsor is traveling on a permanent change of station.

58. May the service member and dependents travel Space-A between CONUS and overseas?

When the service member’s permanent duty station and TDY location are within CONUS, Space-A travel to an overseas area and return is authorized. Also, when the service member’s duty station and TDY location are overseas, Space-A travel to CONUS and return is authorized.

59. May uniformed services personnel on official temporary duty orders (TDY) elect to travel Space-A to the TDY point (station)?

No. Uniformed services personnel on official TDY orders must travel in a duty status from their permanent duty station to the TDY point and return to their permanent duty station.

60. My husband was killed in Vietnam and is buried in the Punch Bowl (National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific) in Hawaii. The children and I would like to take a trip to Hawaii to visit his grave. Can we fly in a Space-A status?

Certain surviving spouses and their accompanying dependents may utilize Space-A  Air Travel.  This applies to surviving spouses of: 
               ∙ Service Members who died on Active Duty
               ∙ Retired Military Members
               ∙ Service Members who died in an inactive training duty status 
                ∙ Service Members who died in an annual training status 
      Source:  DoDI 4515.13, Table 3, Items 48-51 
It is important to note that dependents must be accompanied. Surviving Spouses must have a valid Military ID showing themselves as their own sponsor; a Military ID listing the deceased spouse as a sponsor will not be accepted for unaccompanied travel.  

Documentation Requirements and Eligibility:  4.8.r. of DoDI 4515.13 reads: “Surviving spouses of Service members who died while on active duty, inactive duty training, or annual training status as well as retired military members, and their accompanying dependents, must have a DoD USID and privilege card.  Dependents who are under the age of 14 must possess a Federal-, State-, local-, or tribal government-issued identification.” 
 

61. Should I expect to find more than one Space-A roster on a base?

No. Only one Space-A roster shall be maintained on a base, installation or post. The maintenance of such a roster is the responsibility of the AMC passenger or terminal service activity. If there is no AMC transportation activity, then the base, installation or post commander designates the agency responsible for maintaining the Space-A roster. You may find an exception at locations where a second service has a separate facility such as Andrews AFB and the Washington NAF.

62. Some large people cannot buckle their seatbelts in many of the military aircraft with conventional airline seats, such as the C-005, C-017, and most of the smaller executive military aircraft. Can these passengers bring their own seatbelt extenders?

If a person is too large to fit the seat belt supplied on the C-005 or C-017 they may have to try to obtain travel on another military aircraft i.e., C-130, travelers can utilize the web seats or in a C-017, travelers can sit in plastic side seats, which have a little longer seat belt. Travelers are not authorized to supply their own “extenders” and no such extender has yet been certified for use on the C-005 or any other military aircraft.

63. We have heard that families and other groups can “pool” their baggage authorization. What’s the story?

Space-A passengers traveling together as a group (that is, listed on a single Military Transportation Authorization or AMC Form 140 (Space Available Travel Request)) may pool their baggage authorization so long as the total number of checked pieces does not exceed the number of travelers times 140 pounds, i.e., a five-person family travel group could not exceed 700 pounds (5 x 140 pounds = 700 pounds) and 10 pieces (5×2=10).

64. What are the trends in the availability of Space-A travel? Does it seem there will be more or less Space-A travel in the coming years?

Although AMC has lead efforts to improve Space-A travel in the past few years, movement still remains a result of unused seats. Present DoD personnel and budget trends are effecting Space-A movement opportunity. AMC is dedicated to putting a passenger in every available seat.

65. What can service families do if they become extremely ill while overseas and need to return to the United States?

Air medical evacuation(MEDEVAC) through AMC is available to Active Duty, Retired and their eligible family members. Space-A travelers should get in touch with a U.S. military medical facility, preferably a hospital, or the American Embassy or Consulate to be considered for this service. In a change of military regulations, the remains of a retiree who died overseas may be returned on AMC aircraft to the U.S. for burial.

66. What do I need to know about foreign clearances when traveling?

Foreign clearance relating to Space-A travel is outlined in the DOD Electronic Foreign Clearance Guide located on the Internet at https://www.fcg.pentagon.mil. However, due to security concerns, accessing this publication requires a government login that is only available to DOD employees, DOD contractors, and active-duty U.S. military. Space-A travelers are therefore strongly encouraged to contact the Passenger Service representative at their planned Space-A departure installation for up-to-date requirements regarding clearance requirements (passport, visa, etc.) for their planned foreign destination. All military travelers may also review the following DoD website for passport and visa requirements by country: https://passportmatters.army.mil/Requirements/Visas.aspx

67. What documents are required for traveling Space-A?

All travelers require a uniformed services ID card. Dependent family members and Retirees require a passport in most cases. Visas or visitor cards may be required for passport holders traveling to some destinations. In some cases, immunization records are required. Contact your Passenger Service Representative or see the following website for detailed requirements specific to your planned location:

https://passportmatters.army.mil/Requirements/Visas.aspx

68. What does it mean to be “bumped?”

The mission needs of space-required passengers or cargo may require the removal of Space-A passengers at any point. If removed after being manifested (approved for a particular flight) on a flight or en route, you may re-register with the date and time adjusted to reflect the date and time of registration at the point of origin. The Space-A passengers will be placed no higher than the bottom of the category I on the Space-A register. Space-A passengers cannot be bumped by other Space-A passengers.

69. What facilities are available at military terminals (nursery, BX, snack bar)?

Facilities at most military terminals are generally the same as commercial facilities. Facilities include exchanges, hair care, snack bars, pay television (free television lounge in some military terminals), traveler assistance, baggage lockers or rooms, United Service Organizations (USO) lounges, and nurseries (at major terminals). The type of facilities available will vary according to the terminal size, passenger volume, location and military mission.

70. What fees will Space-A passengers be required to pay?

There are no fees for departure or arrival at U.S. Military Airports/Stations on U.S. military aircraft. For all Space-A Air passengers departing CONUS, Alaska or Hawaii, the following International Head tax and Federal Inspection Service (FIS) Fees were put in effect for 2022: International Head tax fee: $19.70, FIS fee: $16.95.

The tax is $9.90 for domestic segments that begin or end in Alaska or Hawaii (applies to departures only). Example 1: Departing continental U.S. for Hawaii or Alaska, each passenger is charged $9.90. Example 2: Departing Alaska or Hawaii, destined for continental U.S., each passenger is charged $9.90.

For Space-A travel within the continental U.S. on commercial contract missions, the tax is $4.50 for each domestic segment. Example 1: Departing Norfolk and destined for Jacksonville, each passenger is charged $4.50. Example 2: Departing Norfolk and destined for Scott AFB with a stop at Jacksonville, this will be two segments and total charge will be $9.00.

All Military Space-A Air passengers departing on commercial contract missions inbound to the United States must pay a  U.S. Customs Fee, an Immigration Fee, an Agricultural Inspection Fee and a Passenger Facility Charge assessed by an airport for airport improvements. Some foreign country departure terminals may also collect a departure tax: please contact your Passenger Service representative at your planned departure terminal for more details. Please note that all commercial airline passengers pay these taxes and fees in the price of their airline tickets. Payment for these fees must be in United States Dollar Currency or via personal check in U.S. Dollars.

71. What happened to Medevac flights?

The C-9 Nightingales, which were used exclusively for MEDEVAC flights, were retired several years ago. However, the MEDEVAC missions continue. Today, the MEDEVAC mission is accomplished by using a variety of wide-bodied aircraft such as the C-17, C-130, and occasionally C-5 aircraft. Removable MEDEVAC litter and ambulatory pallets are used and may be placed by a forklift into the aircraft being used for air evacuation. Their flight schedules are based on need by military commands around the world. They are not flying on a routine schedule as in the days of the C-9 Nightingales. You may occasionally still find yourself traveling Space-A on a flight with passengers being air-evacuated, only the aircraft and methods of transport have changed.

72. What happens to my sign-up records at a departure location when I fly from that station?

Note carefully that once passengers are selected for a flight, their name will be removed from the station standby register for all destinations.

73. What if I still have questions about Space-A travel?

After reviewing our website for guidance if you still have questions, please send them to us via e-mail at: editor@militaryliving.com or call C-703-237-0203.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

74. What information do you provide for each Space-A arrival/destination installation?

NAME OF U.S. STATE , POSSESSION, TERRITORY OR FOREIGN COUNTRY

Official Name of Arrival or Departure Location/Station

ICAO/IATA – (four-letter ICAO Location Identifier/three-letter IATA Location Identifier). NOTE: In some cases, no IATA code has been assigned to a location and only the ICAO code is provided.

SPACE-A CONTACT AND FLIGHT INFORMATION

Space-A Phone Number: Commercial, DSN and/or fax phone numbers to contact Space-A support personnel at installation.

Flight Recording: Some installations offer recordings via provided phone number describing upcoming Space-A travel opportunities, registration procedures, and other information valuable to the Space-A traveler. This field provides Commercial and/or DSN phone numbers to access Flight Recording.

Terminal Phone: Commercial and/or DSN phone numbers.

Terminal Website: When available, the URL (Uniform Resource Locator) or Internet address of the website offered by the Space-A installation to provide travelers with Space-A related information and updates.

Space-A Email: Email address for Space-A contact.

Space-A Facebook: When available, the official Installation Space-A Facebook page and/or unofficial Space-A Group Facebook page. Please note that Space-A Group Facebook pages that require group membership are NOT official U.S. DOD Facebook pages, but are provided for the convenience of the Space-A traveler. Any information gained from unofficial Facebook sources should be regarded with due caution by the Space-A traveler.

Space-A Twitter: Some locations offer updates and information via Twitter. In those cases, we have provided the Space-A Twitter account name.

SPACE-A FLIGHTS

Flight Frequency and Destination: Provides list of flights to typical destinations and how often Space-A opportunities are available. When possible, these have been categorized as Weekly, Monthly or Infrequently and are organized alphabetically by destination within those categories. Otherwise, appropriate other comments have been provided. Please see “Scheduled Routes and Missions” below for more detailed information.

Flights Originating from This Destination: Any regular flights originating from this Space-A installation (as opposed to transient flights originating elsewhere, but stopping at this destination).

SPACE-A REGISTRATION

Registration Info: May include registration hours, locations, commercial, DSN and/or fax phone numbers, instructions, and any other information relating to the Space-A registration process specific to this location.

Baggage Limitation by Aircraft: Self explanatory.

SPACE-A TERMINAL

Directions to Main Installation: Here you’ll find specific driving instructions to the arrival/departure location/station from local major cities, interstate/national/state/country highways and routes. More than one routing may be provided.

Directions to Space-A Terminal: Driving instructions from installation gate(s) to Air Terminal.

Terminal Address: Air Terminal mailing address.

Terminal Hours of Operation: Self-explanatory.

Passenger Lounge, Amenities and Refreshments: General information about available lounge facilities. General: Locations, hours, telephone number(s), facilities and services. Family: (also known as “special category” lounges) location, hours, telephone number(s), services and restrictions. Distinguished Visitor/Very Important Person (DV/VIP): Location, hours, telephone number(s), facilities, and services. Grades served. Protocol Service: Location, hours, telephone number(s), facilities and services. Grades served. Snack and soft-drink vending, in-flight kitchens, snack bars etc. located within the Air Terminal building. Availability of Internet access/Wi-Fi and if it’s provided free of charge or requires payment of fee.

TRANSPORTATION & PARKING

Parking: Availability, fees, and information relating to short and/or long-term parking.

Most Frequented Nearby Civilian Airport: Name and ICAO/IATA codes of the airport most frequently used to travel by commercial air to/from this installation.

 

SUPPORT AVAILABLE

Support Summary: All information relating to support not covered elsewhere. This may include distances from Passenger Terminal to various support/retail facilities, nearby military installations where additional support is available, etc.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

Other Information: GPS coordinates of Passenger Terminal, LST (Local Standard Time) relative to GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) and comments relating to travel to/from this destination not covered elsewhere. Applicable Customs and Port of Entry comments will also be found here.

SCHEDULED ROUTES/MISSIONS

Recent Air Mobility Command (AMC) scheduled destinations have been listed under the “Flight Frequency and Destinations” element at the originating arrival/departure stations for easy reference and use. These scheduled destinations originate largely in the CONUS. A limited number of AMC destinations originate in OCONUS and selected Foreign Countries (where AMC aircraft are stationed). It is important to note that these flights travel from their originating or home station on a mission/trip, stopping at a few to many stations en route for varied periods of time (from a few hours to overnight to several days or more). In almost all cases these flights return to the originating or home station. If the originating station is not located on or near a CONUS coast, then the flights tend to “stage” stop for an overnight crew rest at a coastal base in CONUS before continuing overseas on their missions. The limited number of flights which do not immediately return to their home station, remain overseas at a station for staging to participate in a future mission or for scheduled maintenance and return to service. There may be any number of missions flown over an established AMC Route. In addition to these scheduled flights there are many non-scheduled flights that operate daily around the world. Information regarding these flights can be obtained from major departure locations in CONUS and OCONUS anywhere from as little as several hours to as much as a week in advance of the mission.

NOTE: These destinations are presented to give you a good idea of Space-Available Air destinations at a given air passenger terminal. This current edition shows the originating station and recent destinations (rather than the entire mission as in previous editions), due to changes in AMC security as a result of 9/11. Because of these security measures, the AMC flight schedules and routes are not released far in advance (72 hours or less is generally standard). Call the recording line or Space-A servicing personnel at the departing installation Passenger Service unit for the most up-to-date scheduled departure and destination information.

* * * IMPORTANT NOTE * * *

Scheduled flights of Military Services (U.S. ARMY, U.S. NAVY, U.S. MARINE CORPS, U.S. COAST GUARD and U.S. AIR FORCE) on Service owned and operated aircraft and contractor furnished and operated aircraft often change with respect to destinations and schedules, with very limited prior notice. Many of the CONUS, OCONUS, and Foreign Country routes have been flown for more than 60 years with constant modification of various elements to meet the needs of the Uniformed Services and other supported United States Interests. This publication provides a snapshot in time (or a profile) of typical information one would expect to find concerning destinations and frequency.

We urge you to always telephone, fax, e-mail, or visit your intended Space-A departure location prior to registering for Space-A travel in order to obtain the latest available information.

75. What is “show time?”

​“Show time” is the time when a roll call of prospective space-required and Space-A passengers, who are waiting for a specific flight, is made. The total available seats are allocated to travelers based on priority category and date/time of sign-up. Failure to make “show time” may result in not making the flight and “show times” can be changed without notice depending on operational requirements. 35. Why can’t passengers arriving at the terminal after “show time” for a flight be processed for that flight? Passengers should realize that many tasks are performed before a flight departs. Every possible effort will be made to process passengers arriving after “show time” if it doesn’t jeopardize the aircraft’s departure time or mission safety.

76. What is a simple summary of the complex guidelines governing Space-A travel during TDY status?

The bottom line is that service members must always travel between their permanent duty station and a TDY point or between two TDY points in a TDY status.

77. What is country sign-up and how does it affect me?

​Under this program, you may sign up for five different countries rather than five different destinations. You are also eligible for the “ALL” sign-up which makes you eligible for all other destinations served. The applicant can sign up for four countries and “all” as the fifth destination. This gives you a greater selection of destinations from which to choose.

78. What is remote sign-up?

​Remote sign-up allows passengers to enter the backlog (apply for Space-A travel) by faxing copies of proper service documentation along with desired country destinations and family members’ first names to the aerial port of departure. The fax data header will establish date/time of signup; therefore, Active Duty personnel must ensure the fax is sent no earlier than the effective date of leave. Mail and e-mail entries are also permitted. The original date and time of sign-up shall be documented and stay with the passenger until his or her destination is reached. Also at any time the passenger may sign up for space-available travel to return to home station. There are also some terminals that allow remote sign up via this website: https://www.amc.af.mil/AMC-Travel-Site/AMC-Space-Available-Travel-Page/Space-Available-Email-Sign-up-Form

NOTE: If applicable, a statement that all required border clearance documents are current is required.

79. What is self sign-up?

​ Self sign-up is a program that allows passengers to sign up at a terminal without waiting in line. Most locations now provide self sign-up counters with easy to follow instructions for registration.

80. What is the best time of the year to travel Space-A?

​ The best time is a function of departure locations, arrival locations, space-required needs and the number of people waiting for Space-A transportation. Generally the best times to travel Space-A are autumn, late winter, early spring and after 15 July. It is best to avoid travel between 1-5 January, 15 May-15 July, 15-30 November and 15-25 December when traffic is heaviest.

81. What is the DSN Phone System and how is it used?

DSN is the Defense Switched Network, which is, among other things, the DOD worldwide telephone system. DSN telephone numbers can only be dialed from one DSN telephone number to another telephone on the Defense Switched Network. Civilian phone systems cannot send or receive calls to or from a DSN phone.

When dialing a DSN telephone number from CONUS to CONUS, the 312 is not required and should not be dialed. When dialing into the following geographic areas using the DSN system, the following area code prefixes must be used:

317 (Alaska)                     312 (Canada)                    313 (Caribbean)

312 (CONUS)                    314 (Europe)                    315 (Pacific)

318 (Southwest Asia)

The phone number listings on this website contains defense telephone numbers and prefixes whenever available. All telephone number formats listed assume that the call is being placed from CONUS for DSN. For example, the DSN telephone information for Ramstein Air Base in Germany looks like this: Main installation number: DSN-314-480-1110. All telephone information sections for Germany and for most installations in other countries with DSN dialing capabilities follow this same basic pattern.

The DSN area codes are not used when dialing from the same area code, e.g., the DSN area code of 314 (Europe) is not used when dialing to a DSN number in area code 314 (Europe) from another telephone with an area code of 314 (Europe).

NOTE: For more detailed information on the DSN telephone network, and a global directory of DSN phone numbers, please visit the following website: http://www.disa.mil/Network-Services/Voice/SBU-Voice/Directory.

82. What is the Environmental and Morale Leave (EML) Program?

This program is designed to provide environmental relief from a duty station which has some “drawbacks” and to offer a source of affordable recreation otherwise not available. In simple terms, it boils down to allowing Active Duty military personnel and their dependents to fly Space-A on military aircraft. There are, however, a couple of big differences in EML leave and regular Space-A leave. First, dependents are permitted to travel accompanied or UNACCOMPANIED by their sponsor. They may utilize “suitably equipped DoD logistic-type aircraft” as well as AMC channel and contract aircraft. Secondly, EML has a Category II classification (for sponsors and their dependents traveling together) which is higher than regular Active Duty, Category III and Retired Space-A classification (Category VI). Dependents traveling on EML leave orders alone are in Category IV. Military sponsors and/or dependents on EML revert to ordinary leave status when they arrive in CONUS. They regain their EML status only when they depart CONUS for their EML program area. A good bit of EML travel is utilized in the Middle and Far East areas. This means that fewer flights may be available from this area for lower category personnel. The EML program is a tremendous morale booster to those assigned in far-off places and is very popular in these areas.

83. What is the Julian Date Calendar and how does it work?

Military organizations often refer to a given date using the Julian Calendar instead of the standard Gregorian calendar we are all used to. To see how the Julian calendar works, and to convert any date to a Julian date (and vice versa), please refer to the document linked below:

Julian Date Calendar Conversion Chart

84. What is the scope of the DoD student travel program?

Dependent students who attend school in the United States are authorized one round-trip Category V classification travel per fiscal year from the school location to the parents’ duty station overseas, including U.S. possessions. The student travel program began in 1984 as a quality of life initiative for service members stationed overseas who had children attending secondary or undergraduate school in the United States. The plan has fluctuated over the years. The rule for the travel program applies to service members permanently assigned outside CONUS authorized to have family members reside with them. The student dependent must be unmarried, under age 23, pursuing a secondary or undergraduate education and possess a valid DD Form 1173 ID card.

85. What Paperwork is Needed to Fly Space-A with My Service Animal?

First, you need to determine if your service animal is a working animal or an emotional support service animal.

The glossary of DODI 4515.13, Air Transportation Eligibility, Section 10: Service Animals, Pets, and Other Animals defines a service animal as, ” Working animals individually trained to perform specific tasks for people with disabilities, such as guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling wheelchairs, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, or performing other special tasks.” If your dog meets these requirements, no paperwork is required on a military aircraft.

Supporting documentation is only required on a military aircraft when you are flying with an emotional support service animal. The following is an extract from DoDI 4515.13, Air Transportation Eligibility, Section 10: Service Animals, Pets, and Other Animals, Para 10.2:

 “10.2. EMOTIONAL SUPPORT SERVICE ANIMALS. a. A passenger must provide proper documentation in order to travel with an animal that is used as an emotional support or psychiatric service animal. The documentation may be no older than 1 year from the date of the passenger’s scheduled initial flight and must be on the letterhead of a licensed mental health professional (e.g., a psychiatrist, psychologist, or licensed clinical social worker), stating:

(1) The passenger has a mental or emotional disability recognized in the American Psychiatric Association’s “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.”

(2) The passenger needs the emotional support or psychiatric service animal as an accommodation for air travel or for activity at the passenger’s destination.

(3) The individual providing the assessment is a licensed mental health professional and the passenger is under his or her professional care.

(4) The date and type of the mental health professional’s license and the State or other jurisdiction in which it was issued.”

For more details, you may view the Instruction itself at this link:

DOD INSTRUCTION 4515.13 AIR  TRANSPORTATION  ELIGIBILITY

Space-A flights may also be offered aboard DoD contracted commercial aircraft. These are governed by the Department of Transportation. 14 CFR Ch. II, (1-1-12 Edition) page 434 says, ” As evidence that an animal is a service animal, you must accept identification cards, other written documentation, presence of harnesses, tags, or the credible verbal assurances of a qualified individual with a disability using the animal.” This regulation goes on to require the same documentation for an emotional support animal as described above.

For more details, you can view this document yourself at this link:

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol4-part382.pdf

Obviously, it’s always a good idea to notify the passenger terminal that you will be traveling with a service dog when you sign up for a space-a seat.

86. When may National Guard and Reservist eligible family members fly Space-A?

When the sponsor retires and receives retired pay and full benefits at age 60, eligible family members may fly Space-A. Family members must be accompanied by their sponsor when flying Space-A.

87. When the service member’s duty station and TDY location are in different countries overseas, and the service member travels Space-A to CONUS, may they return Space- A to their duty station?

No. The service member must return Space-A from CONUS to the overseas TDY point or to a location other than the permanent duty station. He or she must return to the TDY point (at personal expense, if necessary, if Space-A travel is not possible to the TDY point) in order to complete travel to the permanent duty station in a TDY status.

88. Where can I view a complete listing of DOD Space-A regulations?

For a complete listing of DoD Space-A regulations, please visit the following website and see Section 4:

DoDI 4515.3 

89. Which uniformed service uses Space-A more than the others?

Air Force members travel Space-A more than members from any other service followed by the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps.

90. Who can fly space-a?

​Active Duty service members, Guard/Reserve members, retirees, and disabled veterans (with a blue DD Form 2 ID), accompanied by their dependents, may fly Space-A. Dependents of individuals with a red DD Form 2 ID cannot fly Space-A. Some travel restrictions apply. Contact your nearest AMC passenger terminal for more information. 

In October 2020, Change 5 of DoDI 4515.13 went into effect allowing dependent family members of permanent and totally disabled veterans to fly on Space-A flights, as well as surviving spouses and their accompanied dependents.  Please see items 48-51 of Table 3 for more information.  

-Surviving spouses of Service members who died on active duty and their dependents (when accompanied by the surviving spouse)

-Surviving spouses of retired military members and their dependents (when accompanied by the surviving spouse). 

-Surviving spouses of Service members who died in an inactive duty training status and their dependents (when accompanied by the surviving spouse). 

-Surviving spouses of Service members who died in an annual training status and their dependents (when accompanied by the surviving spouse.) 

Details on categories of travel can be found in Table 3 (page 39) in the DoDI 4515.13, found here: DoDI 4515.13

91. Who determines eligibility to fly Space-A?

The four armed services in DoD jointly establish Space-A eligibility which is published in DoD 4515.13 “Air Transportation Eligibility.” AMC’s first responsibility is airlifting official DoD traffic. Space-A passengers are accommodated only after official duty passengers and cargo.

92. Who flies Space-A the most – enlisted personnel, officers, retired members or dependents?

Enlisted members travel Space-A more than all other groups (of course there are more Active Duty enlisted members than any other group).

93. Who has priority on Space-A flights?

The DoD has established a priority system for allocating Space-A air travel. This system is described in detail in Section 4, Space Available Passenger Transportation, DoD 4515.13. The general categories:

Category I: Emergency Leave, Unfunded Travel.

Category II: Accompanied Environmental and Morale Leave (EML). Category III: Ordinary Leave, Relatives, House Hunting Permissive TDY, Medal of Honor Holders, and Foreign Military.

Category IV: Unaccompanied EML.

Category V: Permissive TDY (Non-House Hunting), Students, Dependents, Post Deployment/Mobilization Respite Absence, and Others.

Category VI: Retired, Dependents, Reserve, ROTC, NUPOC and CEC members.

Note: More details concerning each category are available at the following weblink PDF file, Table 3 (page 39):

DoDI 4515.13

94. Who may fly on National Guard and Reserve flights of the Military Services?

All uniformed services personnel and their eligible dependents may fly on most National Guard and Reserve flights depending upon the mission. The National Guard and Reserve have some of the best flights available. The catch is that many are not scheduled flights. Many different types of flight missions are given to National Guard and Reserve units; therefore, one can often find some very special flights to places not normally seen on flight schedules. Most National Guard and Reserve departure locations are listed elsewhere on this website.

95. Why are some phone numbers on this website preceded by C-, while others are preceded by DSN-?

Telephone numbers preceded by a C- are commercial telephone numbers. Telephone numbers preceded by DSN- refer to telephone numbers on the Defense Switched Network. Please return to the FAQs for more information on using the commercial and DSN phone numbers appearing on this website.

96. Why Are the Outgoing and/or Incoming Space-A Flights Sections of a Space-A Terminal Blank?

At some Space-A terminals, incoming or outgoing flights are very few and far between. Some of these locations have no regularly scheduled flights coming in or going out. For these terminals, it would be misleading to list previous flights since the chances of you accessing similar flights in the future are so unpredictable.

In those cases, your only option is to contact the terminal directly to see what flights, if any, may be currently available. Contact information for each terminal is provided in the “Space-A Information” of each terminal.

97. Will I be able to shop at the post/base Commissary and Exchange at my foreign destination?

That depends on your status and the specific location! Please see the charts linked below for shopping privilege information at commissaries and exchanges located at foreign destinations:

Overseas Commissary Shopping Privileges

Overseas Exchange Shopping Privileges

98. Will Space-A travel cost much?

In general, no. Some terminals must collect a federal departure tax and/or a federal inspection fee from Space-A passengers on commercial contract missions. Meals may be purchased at a nominal fee out of most air terminals while traveling on military aircraft. Meal service on AMC Category B commercial flights full plane load charters is complimentary.